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Technical Planning Committee

March 12, 2019 10:00 a.m.

Lake Michigan Room 6100 Southport Road, Portage

Annotated Agenda


    1. Call to Order by Chairman, Opening and Announcements

    2. Pledge of Allegiance; Introductions

    3. Meeting Participation Survey

      INDOT requires NIRPC to develop a questionnaire to help evaluate the success of their efforts to reach out to all members of our community. Participation is strictly voluntary and anonymous.

    4. Minutes of the February 12, 2019 meeting (pp. 1-2)

ACTION REQUESTED: Approval


2.0 Public Comment on Agenda Items

This is an opportunity for comments from members of the audience. The amount of time available to speak will be limited to 3 minutes. Commenters must sign the blue form.


3.0 NWI 2050 Plan Performance-based Planning Framework

The NWI 2050 Plan draft performance-based planning (PbP) framework will be presented. The TPC will be asked to provide a recommendation to include the draft PbP framework in the draft NWI 2050 Plan which will be put out for public comment on 4/1/2019.

ACTION REQUESTED: Recommend


4.0 NWI 2050 Plan draft strategies

The NWI 2050 Plan draft strategies have been reviewed by committees and put out for public comment through February 22nd. The TPC will be asked to provide a recommendation to include the draft strategies in the draft NWI 2050 Plan which will be put out for public comment on 4/1/2019.

ACTION REQUESTED: Recommend


5.0 Final project selection for the 2020-2024 Transportation Improvement Program

Group 1 and Group 2 projects for the 2020-2024 TIP will be further considered. The TPC will be asked to iterate and provide a final recommendation of projects to include the draft 2020-2024 Transportation Improvement Program which will be put out for public comment on 4/1/2019.

ACTION REQUESTED: Recommend


6.0 Topical Committee Reports

Various committees are invited to report out on their meetings.

    1. Environmental Management Policy Committee (EMPC)

    2. Ped, Pedal & Paddle Committee (3PC)

    3. Transit Operators Roundtable (TOR)

    4. Land Use Committee (LUC)

    5. Surface Transportation Committee (STC)

    6. Transportation Resource & Oversight Committee (TROC)

7.0 Reports from Planning Partners

    1. Federal Highway Administration & Federal Transit Administration

    2. Neighboring Regional Planning Agencies


8.0 Other Business, Staff Announcements and Upcoming Meetings

    1. Other Business

    2. Staff Announcements

    3. NIRPC Meetings/Events

      • The Finance & Personnel Committee will meet on Thursday, March 21 at 8:30 a.m. in the Dune Room at NIRPC.

      • The NIRPC Executive Board will meet on Thursday, March 21 at 9 a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at NIRPC.

      • The Surface Transportation Committee will meet on Tuesday, April 2, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at NIRPC.

      • The Transit Operators Roundtable will meet on Tuesday, April 2 at 10:30 a.m. in the Dune Room at NIRPC.

      • The Environmental Management Policy Committee will meet on Thursday, April 4 at 9

        a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at NIRPC.

      • The Land Use Committee will meet on Thursday, April 4 at 10:30 a.m. in the Dune Room at NIRPC.

      • The Ped, Pedal & Paddle Committee will meet on Thursday, April 4 at 1:30 a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at NIRPC.


9.0 Next Meeting

The next Technical Planning Committee meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 11, 2019 at 10 a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at the NIRPC office.


    1. Adjournment


      Requests for alternate formats, please contact Mary Thorne at NIRPC at least 48 hours prior at (219) 763-6060 extension 131 or at mthorne@nirpc.org. Individuals with hearing impairments may contact us through the Indiana Relay 711 service by calling 711 or (800) 743-3333.


      The Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, familial status, parental status, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program.

      Technical Planning Committee NIRPC Lake Michigan Room, Portage, IN

      February 12, 2019 Minutes


      Kevin Breitzke called the meeting to order at 10:05 a.m. with the Pledge of Allegiance and self-introductions. Committee members present were Jim Biggs, Kevin Breitzke, George Topoll, Mark O’Dell, Marino Solario, Dean Button, Michael Griffin, Tim Bietry, David Wright, Tyler Kent, Tom MacLennan, Kelly Wenger, Kay Nelson and Jessica Miller.


      Others present were Ryan Lisek, Craig Phillips, Duane Alverson, Beth Shrader, Matt Mihalik, Jeff Huet, Eric Wolverton, Mark Gordish, Denarie Kane, Dennis Cobb, Don Oliphant, Bruce Spires, David Shilling, Jerry Siska, Michael Duffy, K-Todd Behling, Tom VanderWoude, Frank Rosado, Jr., Nick Bellar, Wendy Vachet, Craig Zandstra, Michael Jabo, Ismail Attallah, Robert Thompson, Deb Backhus, Claudia Taylor, M. Matt Gavelek, Jake Dammarell, Sarah Kobetis and Christopher Murphy.


      Staff present were Trey Wadsworth, Kathy Luther, Mitch Barloga, Charles Bradsky, Dominique Edwards, Gabrielle Biciunas, Scott Weber, Peter Kimball, Eman Ibrahim and Mary Thorne.


      The INDOT participation survey was available.


      The minutes of the January 8, 2019 meeting were approved on a motion by Kay Nelson and a second by Tim Bietry.


      There were no public comment requests.


      Programming

      Charles Bradsky gave a brief overview of the current Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for the Group 2 Michigan City Urbanized Area. There is currently a deficit of $639,000 and this will be addressed next week at the Transportation Resource & Oversight Committee meeting.


      Mitch Barloga described the TIP programming approach. Last fall, the TPC approved a series of funding targets. The next few months identified project types and how they rank with our process. There is only $1 million available for over $10 million proposed. For transit, we will need to cut $10 million in requests to balance the TIP. More money will be available in the out years, but 2020-2023 will be slim. The timeline culminates in adoption of the TIP and NOFA by the Commission at their May 16 meeting. The next NOFA will kick off in September or October with anticipated adoption by the Commission at its meeting in April, 2020.


      Group 2 Michigan City Urbanized Area

      Beth Shrader, City of La Porte and Craig Phillips, City of Michigan City worked together to on roadway improvement funding for projects in Michigan City and La Porte. Funding amount changes were recorded in Excel live and onscreen. On a motion by Tim Bietry and a second by


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      Michael Griffin, the Technical Planning Committee approved the roadway improvement funding for the project selections for Years 2020-2024.


      Group 1 Chicago Urbanized Area

      Charles Bradsky gave an overview on Group 1 highway project funding for the Chicago Urbanized Area which include Lake and Porter Counties. The Bike and Ped deficit in 2022 will be discussed at the Transportation Resource & Oversight Committee meeting on February 26. There is a $375,000 set aside for change orders and other risks. Group 1 Transit will be covered separately. Funding amount changes were recorded in Excel live and onscreen. 2020 is fully programmed.


      In answer to a question by Jeff Huet, Trey Wadsworth said the Schererville project was being scored as a Quality of Place project because it would address congestion. Staff felt that projects already begun should be completed. This project will be included in the 2050 Plan for the next NOFA as a full allocation in 2025-2026.


      Under Roadway Improvements, Denarie Kane presented an update on a letter of support from a developer to the Marcella and 61st Avenue project asking for a change in scoring points from 63 to 68. After discussion and deliberation, the committee felt that while Hobart had a partner, no funding commitment was provided. Michael Griffin moved to award $1.6 million to the Hobart project with the caveat that Hobart would need to come up with the balance in local match and without scoping the project down. Mark O’Dell made the second. The Technical Planning Committee approved the roadway improvement funding for the Hobart project with one no vote by Dean Button.


      Hammond’s Kennedy Avenue project will receive $3,220,000 in 2024. Portage’s Samuelson Road project will receive $306,000 in 2024. They are to rescind their PE/ROW request; find balance from State; pending INDOT commitment. On a motion by Marino Solario and a second by Michael Griffin, the Technical Planning Committee approved the roadway improvement funding for the Kennedy Avenue and Samuelson Road projects in 2024 as awarded.


      Highland reduced its request to the $131,133 available in the Complete Streets category.


      Transit funding was discussed. There is a $10 million deficit of 5307 funding and cuts in funding requests needed to be made. Last week this deficit was demonstrated to the transit operators and several options were discussed. GPTC and East Chicago Transit worked out their funding today. Several items will need to be rechecked by staff. On a motion by David Wright and a second by Michael Griffin, the Technical Planning Committee approved the transit plan as discussed.


      Due to the length of the programming discussions, Kevin Breitzke directed the committee to refer to the meeting schedule. The next Technical Planning Committee meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, March 12, 019 at 10 a.m. in the Lake Michigan Room at NIRPC.


      On a motion by Kay Nelson and a second by Mark O’Dell, Kevin Breitzke adjourned the meeting at 1:35 p.m.


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      NWI 2050 Plan PbP Framework

      Performance-Based Planning (PbP) Framework to track progress in implementing the NWI 2050 Plan along measurable indicators.


      This is an image of an icon for performance-based planning.

      Performance-Based Planning (PbP) Framework 3

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      PbP Overview

      • After the April 2018 round of public engagement four visions for the 2050 Plan were drafted: a connected, renewed,

Draft vision and critical paths

united, and vibrant NWI. Sixteen critical paths to achieve the visions were also identified.


Performance- based planning framework



Performance-Based Planning (PbP) Framework 4

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NWI 2050 plan focus areas

NWI 2050 plan focus areas

Critical paths to achieving NWI’s 2050 vision

Connected NWI /

NWI’s people have accessible, safe, and equal opportunities for working, playing, living and learning.

Renewed NWI /

NWI’s urban and rural centers are places people want to come to and live in, and our environment is safe and healthy.

United NWI /

NWI’s diversity is celebrated, and we work together as a community across racial, ethnic, political and cultural lines for the mutual benefit of the region.

Vibrant NWI /

NWI’s economy is thriving, our people are well educated, growth is planned, and natural and agricultural areas are valued and protected.

Economy + Place / Focusing on NWI’s economy and quality of place


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Update land development policies and strategies to emphasize accessibility between people and opportunities.

Maximize growth in existing centers to enhance civic and economic life and to protect natural areas and farmland.

Collaborate regionally to welcome a diversity of people and talent to achieve mixed and balanced growth.

Promote initiatives and policies to ensure healthy living, sustainability, quality of life, and prosperity.

Environment / Focusing on NWI’s environmental quality


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Connect fragmented natural areas and integrate links between people and green spaces to increase resiliency and health outcomes.

Clean and protect the air, land, water, and natural habitats to sustain and enhance the environment’s safety and health for all.

Build region-wide coalitions to advance environmental sustainability for the benefit of future generations.

Endorse innovative energy and environmental strategies to achieve a balance that protects diverse and unique ecological treasures while fostering a sustainable economy.

Mobility /

Focusing on NWI’s transportation choices


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Complete roadway, bicycle, sidewalk, and transit networks across municipal and county lines to enhance safe and efficient access to opportunities for all.

Improve roadway, bicycle, sidewalk, and transit networks to revitalize existing urban and rural centers and enhance equity.

Prioritize transformative investments to elevate the position of the region and to attract a diversity of residents and high-quality economic opportunities.

Adopt technological innovation that enhances the safe and fluid movement of people and goods to enable a flourishing economy.

People + Leaders / Focusing on NWI’s people and community leaders

erformance-Based Planning (

Commit to removing barriers and obstacles to guarantee equal and accessible opportunities.


PbP) Framework

Focus educational and workforce development initiatives on expanding skills that the modern economy requires.

Foster better communications, cooperation and coordination to bring people together across the lines that divide us.

Embrace a dynamic, diversified and sustainable economy that attracts and retains talent, enhances quality of life, and increases personal and 5 household income.

Critical paths to achieving NWI’s 2050 vision

Connected NWI /

NWI’s people have accessible, safe, and equal opportunities for working, playing, living and learning.

Renewed NWI /

NWI’s urban and rural centers are places people want to come to and live in, and our environment is safe and healthy.

United NWI /

NWI’s diversity is celebrated, and we work together as a community across racial, ethnic, political and cultural lines for the mutual benefit of the region.

Vibrant NWI /

NWI’s economy is thriving, our people are well educated, growth is planned, and natural and agricultural areas are valued and protected.

Economy + Place / Focusing on NWI’s economy and quality of place


image

Update land development policies and strategies to emphasize accessibility between people and opportunities.

Maximize growth in existing centers to enhance civic and economic life and to protect natural areas and farmland.

Collaborate regionally to welcome a diversity of people and talent to achieve mixed and balanced growth.

Promote initiatives and policies to ensure healthy living, sustainability, quality of life, and prosperity.

Environment / Focusing on NWI’s environmental quality


image

Connect fragmented natural areas and integrate links between people and green spaces to increase resiliency and health outcomes.

Clean and protect the air, land, water, and natural habitats to sustain and enhance the environment’s safety and health for all.

Build region-wide coalitions to advance environmental sustainability for the benefit of future generations.

Endorse innovative energy and environmental strategies to achieve a balance that protects diverse and unique ecological treasures while fostering a sustainable economy.

Mobility /

Focusing on NWI’s transportation choices


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Complete roadway, bicycle, sidewalk, and transit networks across municipal and county lines to enhance safe and efficient access to opportunities for all.

Improve roadway, bicycle, sidewalk, and transit networks to revitalize existing urban and rural centers and enhance equity.

Prioritize transformative investments to elevate the position of the region and to attract a diversity of residents and high-quality economic opportunities.

Adopt technological innovation that enhances the safe and fluid movement of people and goods to enable a flourishing economy.

People + Leaders / Focusing on NWI’s people and community leaders

erformance-Based Planning (

Commit to removing barriers and obstacles to guarantee equal and accessible opportunities.


PbP) Framework

Focus educational and workforce development initiatives on expanding skills that the modern economy requires.

Foster better communications, cooperation and coordination to bring people together across the lines that divide us.

Embrace a dynamic, diversified and sustainable economy that attracts and retains talent, enhances quality of life, and increases personal and 5 household income.

16 critical paths

NWI 2050 vision statements


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PbP Overview Continued

Who?

NIRPC Staff overseer for all performance measures with other stakeholders contributing depending on performance measure


A framework of measurable indicators of the Plan’s implementation success that will periodically be reviewed and reported on once every 2 years with targets of reasonably expected desirable levels of performance

Why?

This is an image of an icon for performance-based planning.

So NIRPC can track implementation progress of the plan and proactively allocate resources to areas that lag in implementation progress and to transparently convey to the public how the NWI 2050 Plan is performing


Performance-Based Planning (PbP) Framework 6

This is an image of an icon for performance-based planning.

This is an image of an icon for the plan focus area econony and place.

This is an image of an icon for a connected Northwestern Indiana.

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What is the

Update land development policies and strategies to emphasize accessibility between people and opportunities.


What is the


Performance-based planning framework

performance measure?


Why is the measure important?


What is the scope of analysis?


What data/analysis is needed?


What is happening today?


What is the targeted performance?


Who will help achieve the targets?

All purpose average trip time


NWI residents, employees, and visitors should be able to reach their destinations in an acceptable amount of time.


Lake, Porter, and LaPorte Counties together


Number of trips in Household Travel Survey; Trip purposes in Household Travel Survey; and Trip times from Household Travel Survey


By Car: 18.9 min By Transit: 45.1 min


By Car: 21.0 min by 2035 and 22.0 min by 2050

By Transit: 40.0 min by 2035 and 35.0 min by 2050


All levels of government, INDOT, transit agencies, NIRPC, residents, employers, developers

performance measure?


Why is the measure important?


What is the scope of analysis?


What data/analysis is needed?


What is happening today?


What is the targeted performance?


Who will help achieve the targets?

Work purpose average trip time


NWI employees should be able to reach their workplaces in an acceptable amount of time.


Lake, Porter, and LaPorte Counties together


Number of trips in Household Travel Survey; Trip purposes in Household Travel Survey; and Trip times from Household Travel Survey


By Car: Work purpose average trip time: 25.6 min By Transit: Work purpose average trip time: 92.9 min


By Car: 27.0 min by 2035 and 27.5 min by 2050

By Transit: 85.0 min by 2035 and 70.0 min by 2050


All levels of government, INDOT, transit agencies, NIRPC, residents, employers

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